Last edited by Mooguzil
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of antiphospholipid syndrome II found in the catalog.

antiphospholipid syndrome II

James Tyler Kent

antiphospholipid syndrome II

autoimmune thrombosis

by James Tyler Kent

  • 53 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Elsevier in Amsterdam .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementeditors: Ronald A. Asherson ... [et al.].
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 457 p. :
Number of Pages457
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22522682M
ISBN 100444509879

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by recurring blood clots (thromboses). Blood clots can form in any blood vessel of the body. The specific symptoms and severity of APS vary greatly from person to person depending upon the exact location of a blood clot and the organ system affected. In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the immune system produces abnormal antibodies that make the blood "stickier" than normal. This means people with APS are more likely to develop blood clots in their veins and arteries, which can cause serious or life-threatening health problems. These include.

Antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder characterised by recurrent arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy losses, in the presence of persistently elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or evidence of circulating lupus anticoagulant (these abnormalities are detected by blood tests). Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is caused by the body's immune system producing abnormal antibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies. This increases the risk of blood clots developing in the blood vessels, which can lead to serious health problems, such as: deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

Antiphospholipid Syndrome. Top Story Breathing 'Rheum' in COVID Hotspots: New Orleans finds new 'camaraderie' amid economic bust. Ap   Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a disorder that manifests clinically as recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis and/or fetal loss. Characteristic laboratory abnormalities in APS include persistently elevated levels of antibodies directed against membrane anionic phospholipids (ie, anticardiolipin [aCL] antibody, antiphosphatidylserine) or.


Share this book
You might also like
Rockaway Township

Rockaway Township

The old curiosity shop

The old curiosity shop

Experimenting by an experimenter.

Experimenting by an experimenter.

Design, construction, and performance of micro-surfacing

Design, construction, and performance of micro-surfacing

Lost yeasterday

Lost yeasterday

Goodbye to the snow.

Goodbye to the snow.

Good & evil actions

Good & evil actions

California deserts

California deserts

Orion

Orion

Employee benefits

Employee benefits

Cálido!

Cálido!

Bali and Lombok (Lonely Planet Travel Survival Kit)

Bali and Lombok (Lonely Planet Travel Survival Kit)

Northern waters

Northern waters

Art and the reformation.

Art and the reformation.

Summary of report of the Commissioner of Corporations on cotton exchanges.

Summary of report of the Commissioner of Corporations on cotton exchanges.

I, Claud....

I, Claud....

Antiphospholipid syndrome II by James Tyler Kent Download PDF EPUB FB2

Publisher Summary. This chapter antiphospholipid syndrome II book on the various techniques used in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Patients affected with APS are subject to episodes of thrombosis in arteries and/or veins, pregnancy loss (probably secondary to thrombosis of vessels in the placenta), and thrombocytopenia, associated with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies.

Purchase The Antiphospholipid Syndrome II - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNThis book provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the Antiphospholipid syndrome. One of the most important advances in rheumatology and connective tissue diseases of the last decade.

It provides an explanation for many previously undefined conditions with no clear pathogenesis encompassing all subspeculations in internal medicine as well as obstetrics. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Handbook presents the major clinical features of antiphospholid syndrome, or Hughes’ Syndrome, discussing diagnosis, treatment and management of the illness, in a handy short practical book.5/5(1).

Preface. Editor biography. List of Contributors. History and Epidemiology of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (R.A. Asherson). Milestones in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (R.A.

Asherson et al.). Classification and Epidemiology of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (M. Petri). Immunology and Pathophysiology of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (Y. This book discusses the major clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome. It provides a quick, practical and reader-friendly reference for the different problems that might be encountered in clinical practice.

Treatment is a major concern in an area where evidence-based medicine is sparse and there are chapters dedicated to diagnosis 5/5(1). Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (commonly called antiphospholipid syndrome or APS) is an autoimmune disease present mostly in young women.

Those with APS make abnormal proteins called antiphospholipid autoantibodies in the blood. This causes blood to flow improperly and can lead to dangerous clotting in arteries and veins, problems for a. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder, meaning that the body's immune system makes proteins known as antibodies that mistakenly attack its own cells or tissues.

The syndrome is associated with risk of inappropriate blood clot formation, so it is considered an excessive clotting disorder (thrombophilia). Antibodies normally defend the body against infections. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune and symptoms vary, but may include blood clots, miscarriage, rash, chronic headaches, dementia, and seizures.

APS occurs when your body's immune system makes antibodies that attack phospholipids. Phospholipids are a type of fat found in all living cells, including blood cells and the lining of blood vessels. Book chapter Full text access Chapter 4 - Laboratory Markers With Clinical Significance in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder with no cure, but plenty of people with APS never have symptoms.

Find out what treatments are available. Ronald A. Asherson has 14 books on Goodreads with 26 ratings. Ronald A. Asherson’s most popular book is The Antiphospholipid Syndrome II: Autoimmune Thro.

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, such as lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and.

The antiphospholipid syndrome II: autoimmune thrombosis. [Ronald A Asherson;] -- This book provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the Antiphospholipid syndrome.

One of the most important advances in rheumatology and connective tissue diseases of the last decade. The Antiphospholipid Syndrome II, subtitled Autoimmune Thrombosis, aims to give an overview, in four parts, of this intriguing syndrome.

First is a brief overview of the history and epidemiology, a second part deals with immunology and pathophysiology, a third deals with clinical features, and, finally, several chapters discuss management and prognosis of the : M Bijl, C G M Kallenberg. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system makes antibodies that attack phospholipids, causing cell damage and blood clots.

Learn more about causes, risk factors, signs and symptoms, complications. Ronald A. Asherson is the author of The Antiphospholipid Syndrome II ( avg rating, 1 rating, 0 reviews, published ), Vascular Manifestations of S 3/5(1).

This book provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the Antiphospholipid syndrome. One of the most important advances in rheumatology and connective. This book provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the Antiphospholipid syndrome.

One of the most important advances in rheumatology and connective tissue diseases of the last decade. It provides an explanation for many previously undefined conditions with no clear pathogenesis encompassing all subspeculations in internal medicine.

Antiphospholipid Syndrome 1. Definition: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterised by arterial and venous thrombosis, adverse pregnancy outcomes (for mother and fetus), and raised levels of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies.

Synonyms: • Anti-phospholipid syndrome. The antiphospholipid syndrome has been described for the first time by Graham Hughes in as a condition connected with thromboses or foetal losses and antiphospholipid antibodies presence. Form that time there has been a great progress in knowledge, including antiphospholipid antibodies characterisation, their probable and also possible action, clinical manifestations, laboratory detection.

Introduction. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) [1,2] comprises clinical features such as arterial or venous thromboses and the detection of so-called antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) as anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) or lupus anticoagulant (LA).APLS may be the most common acquired hypercoagulable state, occurring in up to 2% of the general population [3,4].Cited by:   Primary antiphospholipid syndrome: In its primary form, the disease occurs on its own, as opposed to in conjunction with another disorder.

Secondary APS: With this, APS occurs with another autoimmune disorder, most commonly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS): An extremely serious (and extremely rare) form of .